There are an increasing amount of people collecting gold coins, gold bullion and gold bars in the United States, but the precious metal has held value for various purposes for centuries. In fact, the historical literature shows gold being used as far back as the 19th century for treating conditions such as depression, epilepsy, migraines, and glandular problems, reports The Meridian Institute.

Despite the numerous studies suggesting gold has invaluable capabilities, it has garnered little attention in the medical world. Today, most people buy gold for its beauty and monetary significance, but recent experiments have shown that gold may be more a part of humankind than previously thought.

According to the Meridian Institute, there have been several studies suggesting a role for gold as a naturally occurring trace element in the body. While these results mostly focused on its appearance in glandular and reproductive tissues, the findings speak volumes as to how the precious metal may have holistic qualities that have yet to be fully explored by modern culture.

Of course, ancient civilizations have long used gold to treat ailments and disease, but throughout the course of history, its usages seem to have been forgotten. In the past, other trace elements have been discovered to form naturally in the body such as sodium, potassium, and copper, and now with the addition of gold, there may be an even wider interest in the qualities of this precious metal.

Collectors who have garnered a large portfolio full of various types of gold may be holding onto more than a revered display of wealth, but a holistic property all of its own. When looking to invest in collectibles, precious metals may be the most lucrative choice, as they typically appreciate in value, rather than lose importance over time.