Platinum

Platinum has many industrial uses like in vehicle emission control devices, jewelry, chemical production, petroleum refining, and electrical devices. The precious metal is usually thought of third behind gold and silver. The price of platinum generally correlates with the price of gold and silver. Investors wanting to diversify their portfolios with precious metals with platinum usually choose bars or coins.

Compared with gold and silver there are fewer options for platinum bars and coins compared to gold and silver.

Platinum Bars

Platinum bars are a very common way to invest in platinum. The most popular size is the 1 Troy oz bar. The U.S. Gold Bureau offers platinum bars with various hallmarks including PAMP Suisse. Each bar is sealed in packaging. The label features the assayer’s signature, certifies the purity and weight of each bar. The serial number of the specific bar is also included on the label. The serial number can also be found inscribed on the surface of the bar.

Platinum Coins

Platinum coins are alternative to bars. Coins are produced by a government mint like the U.S. Mint and have a face value. The actual value of the platinum of each coin far exceeds the face value of the coin.

The world’s most popular coins like the American Eagle and Canadian Maple Leaf are struck each year using platinum. Unlike the Canadian Maple Leaf which has the same design as the gold and silver version of the coin, the Platinum American Eagle coin differs in design from the gold and silver versions. The Platinum American Eagle was introduced in 1997, and features a different design on the reverse of the coin each year. The obverse was designed by John Mercanti and features the face of the Statue of Liberty. The Platinum American Eagle is the only official investment grade platinum coin of the United States.

As stated earlier, the Platinum Maple Leaf is the exact same as the Silver and Gold Maple Leaf coins. The reverse side of the coin features the sugar maple leaf with engravings of “Canada,” the coin’s weight, purity, and metal content. The obverse is the popular profile portrait of Queen Elizabeth II. These coins were only produced from 1988 to 2001.

The Platinum American Eagle and Platinum Maple Leaf are struck in .9995 platinum.

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